Book Reviews

Review: "History of Madness" by Michel Foucault

James Hollis reviews the new English translation of French philosopher Michel Foucault's magisterial History of Madness, previously available only in abridged form as Madness and Civilization.

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Eyes of Sophia

Darlene Viggiano, M.A. reviews the work The Eyes of Sophia by Donna May & Alan Chien. The piece is a gripping narrative telling of the transformative union of opposites manifest in the flowering relationship of the authors. Love unfolds from the harmony of the two opposite principles, eros and logos.  

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Review of Thomas Kirsch's The Jungians

Thomas Kirsch's book, The Jungians: A Comparative and Historical Perspective, is unique in providing an historical overview of the development and spread of the Jungian movement from its beginnings early in the 20th-century. This highly readable narrative is equally accessible to the specialist and to the interested reader.


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Jung’s Answer to Job: A Commentary

In this article, Susan Rowland pronounces Paul Bishop’s Jung’s Answer to Job: A Commentary as a remarkable and scholarly book that illuminates Jung’s entire opus through comprehensive attention to one of the most striking and distinctive of the Collected Works. Rowland deems Bishop’s commentary on Jung’s Answer to Job as a text no serious reader of Jung should be without and hails it as a successful text for non-Jungian readers interested in such a tragically timely work.

 

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The Ghost at the Back Door

Dolores Brien reviews Sophia Heller's new work The Absence of Myth, in which the author aims to deconstruct theories that consider myth to be essential to our psychic and spiritual well-being.

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